05: Gluing Bowl Segments – Part 4

In this video the individual stave-type segments will be glued together using a “rub joint”. No clamps are used in this process. Franklin Type 2 adhesive is being used. As the stave segments are rubbed together you will feel the glue start to “grab”. At this point stop the rubbing action and hold the joint together with hand pressure for about 30 seconds or more. The staves being glued together should then be set to the side until the glue dries. Place a construction shim under the one side to help support the weight of the stave to keep if from pulling apart while drying. Shims of various thicknesses will be used as we go from the gluing process. After the quarter bowl has been created then you will glue two quarters together to form one-half of the bowl. It should be noted that woods react differently to rub joint process. Mahogany is not a recommended wood when attempting to assemble a stave-type bowl together using a rub joint. For whatever reason, the glue joint acts and appears to be starved creating a weak link in the process.

04: Cutting Veneer Strips – Part 3

This video demonstrates one method of cutting thin slices of wood into veneer to be used as accent strips between the segments of a stave-type segmented bowl. This method can produce veneer strips that are within a tolerance of a few thousands of an inch in thickness to each other. Be sure to have a sharp saw blade and a zero clearance throat plate installed on the table saw. I’m using a combination Forest blade (3/32″ thick, 40 teeth-10″ diameter) with a stabilizer to reduce vibration for this process. I do not have a thickness or drummer sander to run the pieces through after ripping so this is the final process before gluing the veneer to the staves.

03: Cutting Bowl Staves – Part 2

In this video you will learn how to set up and cut individual stave-type segments using a table saw. I use an after-market miter gage made by Kreg that incorporates a veneer scale that divides an angle into tenths of a degree. You should refer to the posting on the HOW website of the PDF document of a PowerPoint I’ve created to assist woodworkers with this whole bowl making process, included is a photo with dimensions of the table saw sled so that you can construct one for your use.

02: Segmented Bowl Design Basics – Part 1

Segmented Vessel Instructions 5-16-2016 PDF

Click on the above attachment to download a free set on instructions for making segmented turnings.

This video walks the beginner through the initial process of designing a segmented bowl without using one of the many sophisticated computer programs available to wood turners. The focus is primarily dealing with stave-type design, which incorporates the use of compound miter joints cut on a table saw. However, I almost always incorporate both stave and block miter segments in the design of my bowls. Block miter segments are simply done by determining how many segments you need and dividing 360 degrees by the number of segments times 2. So the formula: miter angle=360/ (# of segments X 2). I use a computer program created by Kevin Neely to design my bowls. His program is easy to use and can be purchased from his website.

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